3 mistakes you should avoid when pitching a new client

1.     Not adding a personal touch

 

When pitching to a new client, in a sense, you’re verbally selling a vision and the foundation of how one’s business can grow. But, there is another element in pitching that requires knowing the audience and how to snag them. In doing so, it requires background information of the client and/or business, so that when the pitch is given, the executive(s) feels confident that you understand the brand. There are often instances where pitches are eager to plaster cold-hard facts and do not incorporate an emotional connection. To prevent that from happening, connection is key in any situation that requires a business or personal relationship. Present your pitch with a clear and genuine glimpse of your personality while engaging an idea that is addresses the clients needs in an innovative way. This power move could ultimately land you your next BIG client!

 

2.     Pitching the wrong pitch

 

Nothing is worse than recycling a pitch to a potentially new client and forgetting to change the name, intro and/or close. This shows disrespect and laziness to your client, which will ultimately result in a lost opportunity. Pay close attention to the names, location and little details—do not rush and make sure to proofread your work. Twice if needed. It’s an easy mistake that can sometimes be overlooked! Look into Grammarly

 

3.     ‘I’m not sure’

 

At some point during your pitch, the client(s) may ask you questions, it is vital to be able to provide the answers. If you answer, “I’m not sure at the moment” or “I don’t know”, it displays a lack of adequate information which damages the potential business relationship. If one doesn’t have all of the information, it would be wise to have a partner who can back you up or prepare a script for the meeting. The knowledge and belief in one’s product or service is crucial in order to secure a new client acquisition; so know your brand, know your product and most importantly KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE.

 

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Brittney Bogues